Free Camping in Florida – The Ultimate Guide – State Forests – Part 6

Florida State Forest Camping

With 38 State Forests, Florida offers a wide selection of camping opportunities away from the crowds. While most of the State Forests are in the northern half of the State, there are luckily a few forests with camping in the warm south (much appreciated in winter)!

Florida State Forests Map
Florida State Forests Map – Clik to enlarge

In this article, I cover State Forest camping in Florida. Please note – State Forest camping is NOT FREE but affordable starting at $10 per site per night.

Point Washington SF Entrance
Point Washington SF Entrance – click to enlarge

Organization of Public Camping in Florida

Florida Camping Org Chart
Florida Camping Org Chart (Click to enlarge)

As described in the first article of this series and in the org chart above, Florida State Forests are a Division of the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

Several Florida State Forests are managed in cooperation with other agencies such as the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and different sets of camping rules may apply. Safety regulations during hunting season are of specific importance to State Forest visitors.

At last check, I counted 77 vehicle accessible campgrounds available to book via the online booking service Reserve America. In 2020 as a result of COVID-19, booking options changed and online booking is the only method to reserve sites. Drive-up and pay is no longer an option.

If you do not have an account, I suggest you register with Reserve America at your earliest convenience.

Florida Camping Org Chart - State Forests
Florida Camping Org Chart – State Forests (Click to enlarge)

Camping Guide for each National Forest

With so many camping options available in each State Forest, I will write a separate guide for each Forest or region. In the meantime, you can locate all the campgrounds and sites on my interactive map below!

Please check in often!

Krul Campground 1
Krul Campground in Blackwater River State Forest (click to enlarge)

Free or Cheap Camping Map of Florida

This map shows each of the campgrounds or areas, grouped by color. For example, State Park Campgrounds (fee required) are shown as Orange, State Forest Campgrounds (fee required) are shown in Blue.

In Part 7, I write about Wildlife Management Areas (WMA) in Florida and camping opportunities.

Florida State Forests have this signage:

Florida Forestry-Logo
Florida Forestry Logo

Return to Part 5 of this series

YES, Take me to Part 7!

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Free Camping in Florida – The Ultimate Guide – National Forests – Part 5

National Forests in Florida

National Forests and BLM lands offer the ultimate free camping experiences in the USA. Unfortunately, BLM camping is not an option in Florida but the State has three wonderful National Forests to explore.

Let me introduce them:

National Forest Map - Florida
National Forest Map – Florida – Click to enlarge

In this article, I cover National Forest camping in Florida. Please note – National Forest camping is NOT always FREE.

Organization of Public Camping in Florida

Organization of Camping in Florida
Organization of Public Camping in Florida – source: Eben Schoeman (click to enlarge image)

As described in the first article of this series and in the org chart above (green block), there are three National Forests in Florida with drive-up camping facilities.

Dispersed drive-up camping is allowed (with restrictions) but developed campgrounds are very popular for many reasons as I will describe:

Florida Camping Org Chart - National Forests
Florida Camping Org Chart – National Forests (click to enlarge)

Camping Guide for each National Forest

With so many camping options available in each National Forest, I will write a separate guide for each Forest. Please check in often!

Below is a summary.

Apalachicola National Forest – Information and Booking

I will soon post a video review of each campground. In the meantime, here are the two best sources of information:

  • Recreation.gov – excellent website with detailed information about campgrounds in Apalachicola National Forest including maps and photos. Official booking site for National Forest campgrounds.
  • Apalachicola National Forest – official website with detailed background information about the Forest and camping opportunities.
White Oak Landing Campground

Ocala National Forest – Information and Booking

I will soon post a video review of each campground. In the meantime, here are the two best sources of information:

  • Recreation.gov – excellent website with detailed information about campgrounds in Ocala National Forest including maps and photos. Official booking site for National Forest campgrounds.
  • Ocala National Forest – official website with detailed background information about the Forest and camping opportunities.
Clearwater Lake Campground

Osceola National Forest – Information and Booking

I will soon post a video review of each campground. In the meantime, here are the two best sources of information:

  • Recreation.gov – excellent website with detailed information about campgrounds in Osceola National Forest including maps and photos. Official booking site for National Forest campgrounds.
  • Osceola National Forest – official website with detailed background information about the Forest and camping opportunities.
West Tower Campground

Recreation.gov

If you are unfamiliar with Recreation.gov, do spend some time exploring the site. It is the official portal for reservations, venue details, and descriptions of 12 Federal Participating Partners: Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Reclamation, Bureau of Engraving and Printing, Federal Highway Administration, National Archives & Records Administration, National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution, Tennessee Valley Authority, Fish and Wildlife Service, US Army Corps of Engineers and US Forest Service.

Free or Cheap Camping Map of Florida

This map shows each of the campgrounds or areas, grouped by color. For example, State Park Campgrounds (fee required) are shown as Orange, National Forest Campgrounds (fee required in most cases) are shown in Grey.

In Part 6, I write about State Forests in Florida and camping opportunities.

Return to Part 4 of this series

YES, Take me to Part 6!

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Free Camping near Grand Canyon National Park

Free Camping Grand Canyon NP - A Guide

This is a complete blog and video guide to FREE camping in Kaibab National Forest near Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona. There are free camping opportunities near the North and East rims – this guide focuses on the South Rim of the Park.

Kaibab NF Sign - Grand Canyon
Kaibab NF Sign – Grand Canyon South Rim

In this guide, you will find maps with directions, updates on road conditions, locations of most campsites, and availability of amenities such as cell coverage, water, and toilets.

About Grand Canyon National Park and Kaibab National Forest

Kaibab National Forest surrounding the North Rim of the Grand Canyon is managed by the North Kaibab Ranger District, while the South Rim Forest Land is managed by the Tusayan Ranger District.

Grand Canyon Kaibab National Forest Camping
Grand Canyon Kaibab National Forest Camping – Click to enlarge

The Tusayan Ranger Station is just north of Tusayanto the east of Highway 64 before the South Rim Entrance – Phone: (928) 638-2443

Dispersed Info Kaibab NF
Dispersed Info Kaibab NF

Maps and Directions

I highly recommend the Avenza Maps App!

Download the Motor Vehicle Use Maps for Tusayan Ranger District.

For directions, use the Interactive map from the National Forest Service.

Camping inside or near Grand Canyon National Park

Grand Canyon National Park has three campgrounds at the South Rim. Mather Campground, Trailer Village Campground, and Desert View Campground (near the East entrance). Visit the official site for more info.

The U.S. Forest Service operates the fee-based Ten-X Campground 2 miles south of Tusayan. No hookups or showers but with pit toilets and water. Go here for information.

There are several private campgrounds along Highway 64.

Video footage of the FREE camping areas

I am working on a series of driving and drone videos to show what it’s like to camp for free near Grand Canyon NP!

Links will be posted as soon as these are available.

Recommended FREE Camping Areas in Kaibab National Forest nearest to Grand Canyon NP

Dispersed camping is allowed on Kaibab Forest land for a period not to exceed 14 days within a 30 consecutive day period. The 30 day period begins when a camper initially occupies a specific location in the forest. The 14-day limit may be reached either through a number of separate visits or through 14 days of continuous overnight occupation during the 30 day period.

After the 14th day of occupation, the camper must leave Kaibab National Forest until the new cycle begins on day 31.

Do stop at the information board at the Ranger Station just north of Tusayan to read the rules and look at the camping maps.

Grand Canyon Recommended Dispersed Camping
Grand Canyon Kaibab NF Recommended Dispersed Camping – Click to enlarge

As shown on the map below, there are five well-known FREE camping areas within an easy drive from Grand Canyon NP South Entrance:

  • Along Forest Road (FR) 328 – many sites close to the NP border better suited for smaller RVs
  • N Long Jim Loop Road – many sites close to Tusayan but with a lack of privacy
  • Along FR302 – many sites close to the east side of town suitable for larger RVs
  • Along FR688 – further south but with large sites far apart. Great for large motorhomes.
  • Along FR306 – several sites to the west of Highway 64
Grand Canyon Dispersed Campinge
Grand Canyon Dispersed Campinge – Click to enlarge

Free Camping along FR328

If you plan to spend a lot of time in Grand Canyon National Park and want to camp as close as you can, then you should consider this area.

Grand Canyon Free Camping in Kaibab NF - Map
Grand Canyon Free Camping in Kaibab NF – Click to enlarge

In the map above, you see the entrance of FR328 to the west of Highway 64 just before the South Entrance. As with all of the camping along Highway 64, you cannot camp within 0.25 miles from the Highway. In this case, the no-camping zone is marked in red on the map. To make it easy, do not camp until you reach Apache Stables on the left!

FR328 Campsites
FR328 Campsites

If you have a large camper it is best to find a site along the main FR328. The road is washboard but fine for all vehicles. Continue all the way to the left-turn on top of the hill (1.7 miles) and beyond.

High-clearance vehicles and vans will find secluded sites in the loop to the left (of FR328 as shown) off FR3280.

About potable water and toilets – as shown on the map there are toilets to the north just before the South Entrance. There are many free water stations at Grand Canyon Village (limited in winter).

Verizon has good LTE service at these campsites.

Kaibab NF Toilets
Kaibab NF Toilets

Free Camping along N Long Jim Loop Drive near Tusayan

The most popular dispersed camping area with easy access to town and Highway 64.

Grand Canyon Free camping - N Long Jim Loop
Grand Canyon Free camping – N Long Jim Loop – Click to enlarge

Try to avoid camping with 0.25 miles then search for a spot on both sides of the road for the next 0.5 miles. You can also see some side roads on the map – try those too.

N Long Jim Loop Campsites
N Long Jim Loop Campsites

As stated, this is a popular area and if you pick a large site someone will probably pull in close to you. For complete privacy, you may want to camp elsewhere or drive up the hill (4WD recommended) shown to the north on the map as a loop..

About potable water and toilets – there are toilets to the north just before the South Entrance. There are many free water stations at Grand Canyon Village (limited in winter).

Verizon has good LTE service at these campsites.

Free Camping along FR302 outside Tusayan

FR302 is one of three Forest Roads recommended by local rangers. There are many sites (mostly to the left) as you drive in. Just look for road tracks.

Grand Canyon Free Camping – FR302 – Click to enlarge

The information board is at 0.3 miles on the left and camping basically starts there! I do not show all the sites on the map but you do not have to travel more than 2 miles to find something.

One can fit most size RVs in there and there is plenty of shade.

Free Camping along FR302 near Grand Canyon
Free Camping along FR302 near Grand Canyon

About potable water and toilets – unless you want to try the town, there are toilets to the north just before the South Entrance. There are many free water stations at Grand Canyon Village (limited in winter).

Verizon has very good LTE service at these campsites.

Free Camping along FR688 and FR306 south of Tusayan

FR688 is perfect if you want absolute privacy and/or want a large site for your rig and toys. Yes, it is a longer drive to the South Rim but you have easy access to Highway 64.

It is recommended by local rangers.

Grand Canyon Free Camping - FR688
Grand Canyon Free Camping – FR688 and FR306 – Click to enlarge

Not all campsites are shown! There are many and you can drive for at least 2 miles (and longer) to find sites.

Free Camping along FR688 near Grand Canyon
Free Camping along FR688 near Grand Canyon
Free Camping along FR688 near Grand Canyon
Free Camping along FR688 near Grand Canyon

I did not feel a need to explore FR306 but it is recommended by local rangers.

About potable water and toilets – unless you want to try the town, there are toilets to the north just before the South Entrance. There are many free water stations at Grand Canyon Village (limited in winter).

Verizon has very good LTE service at these campsites.

Precise Campsite Locations and Recommendations

If you want GPS waypoints and my personal recommendations for free campsites, please consider becoming a Patron (Supporter) of my work for a small monthly contribution!

https://www.patreon.com/letseeamerica

The reasons are:

Many travelers want dispersed camping to remain “secret”. In their opinion, these free locations will become overrun with campers if one discloses too much information.

I disagree! Let me explain.

I understand the visitation impact of COVID-19 on Public Lands. We are told to go outside and enjoy nature as a safer alternative to indoor activities. The result is obvious – there are more folks camping and there is more trash and land damage to deal with.

Popular dispersed camping areas are near capacity on most nights – leading to frustration for full-timers who depend on free camping in order to travel on low budgets.

The truth is – information about dispersed campsites are freely available. There are phone apps showing locations, many websites do the same and Rangers will gladly share tips about where to camp for free in their Districts!

So the issue is not about sharing dispersed campsite locations with the public. It’s happening already.

In my opinion the REAL challenges are:

1. Education – how do we educate the general camping public about the importance of camping etiquette on Public Lands?

2. Spacing – how do we get folks to spread out and explore locations further away from the major access roads and crowds?

3. Amenities – how do we convince the Public Land authorities to provide more toilets, potable water, and trash bins?

My Contribution

I share general information about dispersed camping to the public because I believe it is educational (at the very least it helps to prevent illegal camping and it helps with spacing when folks know where more campsites are located).

To further assist with spacing, I do not share the locations of my favorite campsites or recommendations with the general public. I am trying to prevent people from rushing to the same few free campsites (the very best ones) around the country. This information is only available to my patrons.

Free Camping on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Land

BLM Land Camping

Understanding your options for free camping on BLM land is a key requirement for budget-minded and secluded travel across the Western States of America.

Unlike National Forests (another popular free camping option), BLM boundaries can be much more challenging to figure out! It is not uncommon to find “private – no entry” signs on land that appears to be public (depending on the map you’re looking at). There are even internet reports of harassment from local landowners when campers are clearly on BLM land!

It is really up to each camper to thoroughly research each BLM District in question. When in doubt, please visit or call the nearest BLM District office for clarification.

COVID-19 Challenges – Policies are different in every state. Please the BLM website for updated information. https://www.blm.gov/locations

In this article, I offer tips and ideas to help you navigate the basics of free camping on BLM lands!

What is the Bureau of Land Management (BLM)?

Simply put, it is an Agency within the Department of the Interior responsible for administering public lands as shown in the diagram below.

The diagram also shows the States where BLM operates (including all the Eastern States) as well as two websites – one for information and one for booking.

BLM Organization
BLM Organization

Where does BLM operate?

Nationwide as shown above but in terms of camping, most of the opportunities are west of the Mississippi River.

The image below illustrates the distribution of BLM land quite clearly.

Bureau of Land Management Map
Bureau of Land Management Map (Source – Department of the Interior)

How to find BLM Campgrounds and sites?

There are mainly three styles of camping on BLM land –

  1. Campgrounds – developed camping areas with amenities of some kind! Most are fee-based. Many (most?) are first-come-first-serve, meaning you choose an available campsite and pay a nightly fee. Some sites can be pre-booked online (link below).
  2. Dispersed – Mostly free and without amenities. You scout the BLM land and set up camp away from developed campgrounds. BUT, dispersed camping does not mean you can set up camp anywhere you want. There are basic rules for each particular land (you can generally stay free for 14 days per month).
  3. Managed Dispersed – In popular locations, the rangers may mark or number the dispersed sites in order to manage crowds and land erosion. You can only camp in those marked sites.

To find developed campgrounds, you have two options:

  1. Use the search box on the BLM website. Go Here to Search for BLM Camping.
  2. Use a third-party website (See my list of recommended sites for FREE camping.
BLM Camping Search
BLM Website Camping Search

To book a reservable site in a developed campground, Go Here to Book Using Recreation.gov

Recreationgov Booking
Recreation.gov Booking website

Experienced campers often go straight to Recreation.gov because they know what they are looking for and how to navigate this useful site! I will write a future article to share tips and tricks!

To find dispersed campsites you have several options:

1. Third-party websites (mentioned above) are your best friends. The dispersed campsites listed on their maps often have fire rings and you can expect those sites to comply with local rules (such as distance from water sources, etc). Unfortunately, when sites are easy to find and listed everywhere they tend to get busy!

Two notes of caution:

a) third-party websites are often inaccurate because they depend on input from the public. This works great in most cases but sometimes folks camp illegally (knowingly or not) and then share the locations! Or they mess up the GPS waypoints!

b) directions and road conditions may change! Study your GPS, know the off-road capabilities of your vehicle, and do not overestimate your driving skills.

Many full-time road warriors use free dispersed camping and their Youtube videos are fun and informative if you’re interested. I provide detailed information on this website and on my Youtube channel – Lets-See-America

2. To avoid the crowds, experienced gypsies do their own research using Google Maps and Google Earth to scout for new dispersed camp spots in advance. To avoid getting into trouble with rangers, they educate themselves with land boundaries and local rules. If you want to do the same, please adhere to “Leave-no-Trace” principles and do not unintentionally “develop” new campsites.

3. Visit or call local BLM District Offices and talk to the Rangers! They will explain the local rules and direct you to approved dispersed camping areas.

Arriving on BLM lands

Many areas have signs next to the highway indicating the start or end of Public Lands. Look for this signage:

Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Logo
Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Logo

Recreation areas may have information boards indicating allowed activities and camping rules.

BLM Information booth at Hurricane Cliffs in Utah

Here is what I do after arrival:

  1. I do my best to arrive before 4 pm in a new area. Searching for a site after dark is no fun.
  2. I study my paper and/or online maps to ensure I stay within the BLM boundaries.
  3. I look for information boards (see image above). Those are really helpful but rare!
  4. I pick an unoccupied site using basic common sense (away from other campers for example)
  5. I clean the site – broken glass, trash, etc. You do not want to ruin your tires or cut yourself during your stay.
  6. I walk the neighborhood just to see who is near and what escapes routes I have in case of emergencies or danger. I generally park my vehicle pointing towards the road for a faster getaway!

Finally, read or watch my BLM camping posts and become a Patreon!

I stay mostly on free Public Lands and write often about my experiences! These articles are sorted by State.

I provide clear directions with accurate GPS coordinates and post photos, video, and drone (aerial) video of each location.

If you want my personal tips and opinions, please become of Patreon of my work! For a small monthly contribution you help fund my research expenses and you gain access to exclusive information about travel destinations such as the best (or worst) sites in a particular BLM area!

Patreon Page – Lets-See-America

Free Camping in Florida – The Ultimate Guide – Bureau of Land Management (BLM Land) – Part 2

BLM Website Search

When you arrive in Florida after camping on BLM Land in the Western part of the USA, you may find the free camping opportunities confusing and rather disappointing. In fact, some folks still think free camping in Florida is a myth! Well, BLM Land camping in Florida is non-existent. But you have plenty of other opportunities to explore.

While talking about camping in Florida, there is no need to discuss BLM in-depth but I want to point out a few important things just as a comparison to the public land management in Florida.

What is the Bureau of Land Management (BLM)?

Simply put, it is an Agency within the Department of the Interior responsible for administering public lands as shown in the diagram below.

The diagram also shows the States where BLM operates (including all the Eastern States) as well as two websites – one for information and one for booking.

BLM Organization
BLM Organization

Where does BLM operate?

Nationwide as shown above but in terms of camping, most of the opportunities are west of the Mississippi River.

The image below illustrates the distribution of BLM land quite clearly.

Bureau of Land Management Map
Bureau of Land Management Map (Source – Department of the Interior)

How to find BLM Campgrounds and sites?

There are mainly two types of BLM camping styles –

  • Campgrounds – developed camping areas with amenities of some kind! Most are fee-based. Many (most?) are first-come-first-serve, meaning you choose an available campsite and pay a nightly fee. Some sites can be pre-booked online (link below)
  • Dispersed – Mostly free. You scout the BLM land and set up camp away from developed campgrounds. As long as you follow the rules for that particular land you can generally stay free for 14 days.

To find developed campgrounds, you have two options:

BLM Camping Search
BLM Website Camping Search

To book a reservable site in a developed campground, Go Here to Book Using Recreation.gov

Recreationgov Booking
Recreation.gov Booking website

Experienced campers often go straight to Recreation.gov because they know what they are looking for and how to navigate this useful site! I will write a future article to share tips and tricks!

To find dispersed campsites, the third-party websites mentioned above are your best friends. The dispersed campsites listed on their maps often have fire rings and you can expect these sites to comply with local rules (such as distance from water sources, etc). Unfortunately, when sites are easy to find and listed everywhere they tend to get busy!

Many full-time road warriors use free dispersed camping and their Youtube videos are fun and informative if you’re interested. Some say they have not paid for camping in 5 or more years!

To avoid the crowds, experienced gypsies do their own research using Google Maps and Google Earth to scout for new dispersed camp spots in advance. To avoid getting into trouble with rangers, they educate themselves with land boundaries and local rules. If you want to do the same, please adhere to “Leave-no-Trace” principles and don’t unintentionally “develop” new campsites.

BLM areas have this signage:

Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Logo
Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Logo

Return to Part 1 of this series

Continue to Part 3 – US Army Corps of Engineers Camping in Florida

Florida State Forest Camping

Free Camping in Florida – The Ultimate Guide – State Forests – Part 6

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